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A College Town Takes On Its History and the Alt-Right

It’s hard to separate a college from the college town – or in this case the University of Virginia from Charlottesville. Here even the mayor is an adjunct professor. So as the town braces for what could be a significant gathering of the alt-right on August 12th residents talked about how they got to where they are today – and the difficult discussions about race that need to happen.

Thinking about School Choice


I’d been thinking about school choice and how to possible explore the issue. K-12 isn’t usually part of our mission since we focus on higher education, but when the U. Rochester mentioned this program in a pitch to interview their president, I had to find out more. There continue to be significant challenges for this community, but seemingly tuning out the current political rhetoric, these educators of focused on how to improve the lives of their inner-city youth.

 

Dr. Bunsen Honeydew Is Always a Win

There was more than one set of Dr. Bunsen Honeydew and his assistant Beaker at the March for Science and that made the event even more wonderful. Second in size only to the Women’s March, this celebration of the importance of research and facts was well attended, despite a steady rain. Here is the picture essay from the day.

Scenes from the March for Science and Earth Day, April 22 2017 on the mall, Washington, D.C.
Chronicle photo by Julia Schmalz

Groups That Oppose Abortion See Opportunity Under Trump

This year I attended the March for Life  for our sister publication, The Chronicle of Philanthropy. The story was on groups that oppose abortion see opportunity under Trump.

Scenes From the Women’s March on Washington

Hundreds of thousands of protesters took to the streets of Washington, D.C. Below the sea of pink, connections to academe were easily found below the surface.  Here is a photo essay from the day.

Scenes from the Women’s March on Washington following the inauguration of Donald J. Trump as president of the United States, Washington D.C.
Chronicle of Higher Education photo by Julia Schmalz

First Amendment

The First Amendment (Amendment I) to the United States Constitution prohibits the making of any law respecting an establishment of religion, impeding the free exercise of religion, abridging the freedom of speech, infringing on the freedom of the press, interfering with the right to peaceably assemble or prohibiting the petitioning for a governmental redress of grievances.

Reading this everyday.

Confirmation for Betsy DeVos

DeVos Takes Center Stage: Highlights From Her Confirmation Hearing